“Taking a Negative Effect, Making a Positive Affect.”
  • Lizzie PRB Jenkins

    Founder and President of the Real Rosewood Foundation, Inc.

    An Educator: Lizzie Polly Robinson Brown Jenkins was born October 25, 1938, in Archer, Florida, growing up on a farm with her parents, Ura McIntyre Robinson and Theresa

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  • Woman Chronicles Rosewood

    Lizzie Jenkins has spent a decade sorting through musty files in her search for details to confirm what happened to her aunt and uncle when the predominantly black Levy County town of Rosewood was burned to the

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  • History of Rosewood, Florida

    FOUNDING OF ROSEWOOD

    Rosewood was established around 1870 in Levy County, Florida on a road leading to Cedar Key and the Gulf of Mexico. It is believed to have taken its name from the abundant red

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  • Theresa Brown Robinson

    The mother of Lizzie Jenkins and the sister of Mahulda Carrier, Theresa Brown Robinson was a Rosewood historian who provided Lizzie enough information to interest and direct her in safeguarding Rosewood's history. She never lived in Rosewood

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  • The Real Rosewood
    Foundation, Inc

    The Real Rosewood Foundation was created in 2002 to develop a timeline, expand the search, find lost survivors, and locate descendants – black and white, inviting cultural participation to preserve an important history

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If you would like to make a donation to The Real Rosewood Foundation, Inc., click on the Paypal button and you will be redirected to Paypal's secure site. No donation is too small and every dollar will help. The Foundation has already awarded several academic scholarships and is also seeking to build a Rosewood museum in memory of survivors and descendants in Archer.
 
 

alachua

Read about how Alachua County’s African American ancestry contributed significantly to the area’s history in Lizzie Jenkins' book, Alachua County, Florida.

 Purchase Now!

The Real Rosewood Foundation, Inc.

The Real Rosewood Foundation was created in 2002 to develop a timeline, expand the search, find lost survivors, and locate descendants – black and white, inviting cultural participation to preserve an important history.

Though it has been ninety years since the massacre, the descendants are still in touch with their beginning. Each year in July they celebrate family reunions. They are not angry and do not dwell on the past destruction of their hometown. Choosing to attain higher learning, many have gone on to become educators, doctors, lawyers, engineers, superintendent of schools, and skilled workers. They never lost the work ethics and values instilled in them by their ancestors. A most recent development regarding Rosewood is the interest of white Rosewood descendants in helping protect the history.

This foundation is dedicated to building a museum in memory of the Rosewood survivors and descendants at Mahulda's Archer, Florida homestead. Additionally, the foundation sponsors a scholarship in honor of Mahulda Gussie Brown Carrier, the third Rosewood schoolteacher employed in Levy County. Carrier is the first and only black female principal employed in Levy County and is believed the second black female principal hired in the state of Florida . The foundation is working to produce a documentary recapping real truths by historian Lizzie Jenkins, founder and president of The Real Rosewood Foundation, who is writing her life story which includes how she unlocked the secrets of Rosewood through consistent research. Moreover, the foundation is producing two songs, "Rosewood Florida" and "Rosewood, No More".

 

From the Desk of Founder and President, Lizzie PRB Jenkins:

Long before The Real Rosewood Foundation was created, my mother strongly suggested researching the real truths of the Rosewood occurrence. The two of us shared the dark secrets of the Rosewood story over the years starting in 1943, when I was only five. For me, the most significant part of the Rosewood story is centered on its schoolteacher, Mom’s sister, my favorite aunt and mentor, Mahulda Gussie Brown Carrier.

The memory of Rosewood is constantly on my mind. I have not been able to lay the burden of its history down. To my mother, Theresa Brown Robinson, Rosewood was a “song” etched in her heart. She promised my Aunt Mahulda that she would keep her secrets safely hidden, but the thought of what happened to her dear sister in Rosewood made the vow too tremendous a task to keep silent during the making of the movie, ROSEWOOD. As the title of the old Negro Spiritual suggests, “I Said I Wasn’t Gonna Tell Nobody but I Couldn't Keep It to Myself,” my mother was compelled to share her sister’s story, reliving the horrifying and hostile events she witnessed in 1923, at age 21. Mom contributed a great deal of information to the moviemakers; however, they used her information and did not properly give credit.

She was offended after watching the Rosewood movie and charged me with completing her Rosewood research, firmly stating, "Mommy didn't raise no fools. You finish my research and tell our own Rosewood story. I have given you enough oral family history to make a documentary and you must do just that!"

Because Mom was never satisfied with the violations her sister endured during the savage attacks on an innocent people, she assigned me the task of authenticating Rosewood's truths. “You must keep Sister’s name in Rosewood’s history,” aware her sister had suffered physically and mentally during the vicious raid of her hometown. Mom instructed me to start a scholarship in her sister Mahulda's name and build a museum honoring all Rosewood survivors and descendants. If I were to do a thorough job as requested by my mother, I understood it would become a lengthy journey and challenging project. And Mom's expectation of me radiated when she said,

If mama [I] wasn’t so old, I'd do it myself.

From my mother's point of view, as told to her by her sister the Rosewood schoolteacher, I set out with pen and pad to bring respect and dignity to a history that was dormant for years because of the embarrassment it would add to Levy County. The incomplete work of Rosewood is the glue that holds Mom’s lessons and my writings together.

Being an educator, I wanted to educate professors, teachers, and students. I could not begin to do such without supporting evidence, therefore, I made it my mission to confront the danger and take charge of a family history that I am proud of because I have learned truth and now use that same truth to impart important lessons and build better race relations. Educate people on the real Rosewood history… In order to do this, I dedicated time to researching the records dating back to 1845, when my great, great, grandfather, Henry McIntyre, arrived in Cedar Keys as a one-year-old toddler. Side Note: I have not been able to place him with a family. According to the Levy County 1870 Census, my great, great, grandfather was a 24-year-old black male, laborer and full-time stud, father of six children, and husband of a 25-year-old black female named Emma McIntyre. They lived on the adjacent Lot 202 next to who is believed to be Sheriff Robert Walker’s cousin, Harriet Walker, a white single woman with four children who lived on Lot 201, known then as "Outside of Cedar Keys District”. One can deduce that Sheriff Walker’s actions, working tirelessly to save Rosewood citizens, were because he knew many of the residents personally. Read Rosewood History

I have done the research, authenticated and documented my findings; therefore, Rosewood’s real story is my story. I am neither angry nor bitter about a situation I did not cause. I do not blame and will never accuse anyone of this undesirable saga during that era. It is Florida's history and needs to be told and archived for future generations, never to be repeated.

"Unless we remember, neither we, nor future generations will understand..."  – Lillian Brown, AARP

The Real Rosewood – Extra

Levy County Colored Founders

Levy County consisted of four Florida cities/towns: Outside of Cedar Key, Lukens, Rosewood, and Sumner. The county's first census was taken in 1850. In the mid-1800s, one of Levi County's presumed slave-holding plantations, documented as Outside of Cedar Key, was listed on the 1870 census as District 15. Believably, Outside of Cedar Key, Florida was developed and became known as Rosewood and Sumner – from its adjacent sister city, Cedar Key, Florida.

 

1870 CENSUS – (BELIEVED) ROSEWOOD COLORED FOUNDERS
IF ROSEWOOD WAS FOUNDED AFTER 1870 AND BEFORE 1885

Adams Anderson Ashwood Bradley Bright
Carlos Carrier Carter Caskill Clower
Cottenell Douglas Everet Frison Gordon
Hall Hearn Higginbotham Higginbottom Hill
Hindon Hughes Jones Joseph Lenke
Lewis Lighter London Lot Love
Lucas Lundon Lundy McHenry McIntyre
Mitchell Moore Moses Murray Nelson
Nicks Norris Payton Randolph Ransom
Rice Richardson Roberts Robinson Sanderson
Seabrook Small Smith Spicer Stedom
Stewart Strobles Strong Thompson Turner
Wade Wadsworth Walker Warren White
Wiggins Williams  Wilson Woodard  
Levy County White Founders

1870 CENSUS – (BELIEVED) ROSEWOOD WHITE FOUNDERS
IF ROSEWOOD WAS FOUNDED AFTER 1870 AND BEFORE 1885 

Barcol Barker Barnes Barreco Beck Bevill Blair Blitch Boyetts Bradford
Brady Brand Brannes Brannery Bright Brown Bryant Burke Butler Bryce
Caddes Campbell Cannon Carlos Cassis Cason Caulter Chambers Cherie Chesser
Chissie Clark Clary Clower Clurry Clyatt Cobb Cokes Coleman Cook
Collier Collins Colson Crevor Crews Cribbs Curry Daniels Daves Day
Deson Dias Decks Dong Douglas Drummond Ericcos Faircloth Fairhouse Flemming
Folks Fitzgerald Fountain Frey Futch Gaines Gainey Galbreth Garrison Gore
Green Griffis Hagans Hall Handly Hardee Harrington Hatcher Higginbotham Highsmith
Hobbs Hodge Holland Hudson Hunter Ingraham Ingram Jackson Jacobs John
Johnson Jones Keen King Kinsey Kirkland Kister Kurn Lancaster Lane
Lanier Lee Lenke Lock Love Loyd Lynn Marston Martin Maxwell
May McCaskill McGoins McGowan McGown McLeod McMillan McQuire Micken Mitchell
Moore Morgan Morrison Mossey Mozo Mullens Mulligan Munden Murphy Nobles
Norris Nunnerly Osteen Parrish Peacock Phelps Philpot Pissner Price Priest
Proctor Quincy Quinn Ratliff Rawls Renfroe Rhodes Ricks Sarbles Shaw
Sheffield Sheppard Shirley Smith  Snell  Standard  Standley  Stanley  Starling  Stephens
Stockman Strobles Studstill Swandel Sykes Thompson Tindell Triocally Trivalt Truden
Tucker Turner Tuten Wade Walker Watson Ways Weeks Wells Whatley
White Whitehurst Wilcox Wilkerson Williams Wimberly Wood Wothington Wright Yates
Yearty Young                
THE WORKS OF LIZZIE JENKINS:

Established the Real Rosewood Foundation, Inc.

Acquired Solicitation License

Acquired 501(C)3 Status

Copyright Protection

Documented Rosewood Marriages from 1882-1923

Confirmed Rosewood Families

Confirmed Rosewood Black Cemetery

Researched / Documented the Rosewood School

Confirmed Sumner School

Established a Historic Marker

Click here to read more about the founder, Lizzie Jenkins.

 

Click Here to view documents.

You can read letters and notes from high-ranking government officials (and others) regarding the atrocities of the Rosewood Massacre and their support of The Real Rosewood Foundation through the work of Lizzie Jenkins.

The 84 Year Curse

...A Story to be Unveiled in an Editorial

THREE GENERATIONS OF VIOLENCE ON THE SAMS WOMEN

1839 – Juliann Parchman Sams
1923 – Mahulda Gussie Brown Sams Carrier
2007 – Lizzie Polly Robinson Brown Sams Jenkins

LIZZIE JENKINS – MOM'S FAMOUS QUOTES:

"Everything happens for a reason."
"Stand strong.”
“Don't take any wooden nickels."
"Mommy didn't raise no fools."
"You are my child and I raised you right."
"Fight for your civil rights as long as breath is in your body!"
“Baby, Mommy will always watch over you, my child.”

 

RACISM: Hate, Conspiracy, Disrespect and Attacks are dangerous behaviors at its worse!

EDITORIAL IS COMING SOON